Return

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DEFINITION of 'Return'

The gain or loss of a security in a particular period. The return consists of the income and the capital gains relative on an investment. It is usually quoted as a percentage.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Return'

The general rule is that the more risk you take, the greater the potential for higher return - and loss.

Return is also used as an abbreviation for income tax return, see 1040 Form.

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