Return On Total Assets - ROTA

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DEFINITION of 'Return On Total Assets - ROTA'

A ratio that measures a company's earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) against its total net assets. The ratio is considered an indicator of how effectively a company is using its assets to generate earnings before contractual obligations must be paid.

To calculate ROTA:

Return On Total Assets (ROTA)

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Return On Total Assets - ROTA'

The greater a company's earnings in proportion to its assets (and the greater the coefficient from this calculation), the more effectively that company is said to be using its assets.

To calculate ROTA, you must obtain the net income figure from a company's income statement, and then add back interest and/or taxes that were paid during the year. The resulting number will reveal the company's EBIT. The EBIT number should then be divided by the company's total net assets (total assets less depreciation and any allowances for bad debts) to reveal the earnings that company has generated for each dollar of assets on its books.

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