Revaluation Reserve

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DEFINITION of 'Revaluation Reserve'

An accounting term used when a company has to enter a line item on their balance sheet due to a revaluation performed on an asset. This line item is used when the revaluation finds the current and probable future value of the asset is higher than the recorded historic cost of the same asset.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Revaluation Reserve'

A revaluation reserves fall under the category of supplementary capital, in that it does not reflect ordinary business results. Because of this revaluation, reserves typically are not counted as capital that can be leveraged for financial institution's, such as a bank's, contractual provisions.

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