Revenue Agent

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DEFINITION of 'Revenue Agent'

An accountant who works for the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS). A revenue agent's job is to examine and audit the financial records of individuals, businesses and corporations to make sure that tax liabilities have been met. These individuals can be employed by the Internal Revenue Service or by local or state government entities. Typically, revenue agents hold a bachelor's degree or, in some cases, an associate's degree in accounting.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Revenue Agent'

Some revenue agents work exclusively on the records of suspected criminals, including drug dealers and money launderers. Those agents who specialize in this field may be required to provide testimony in a court of law. Senior revenue agents generally examine the most complicated tax returns involving individuals or businesses. Revenue agents can specialize in a variety of divisions. These specialists can have many areas of expertise and a variety of titles, such as financial products and transactions examiners (FPTE); international examiners (IE); employment tax specialists (ETS); and computer audit specialists (CAS).

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