Reverse Conversion


DEFINITION of 'Reverse Conversion'

A finance and risk management technique based on a put-call parity strategy that consists of selling a put and buying call (a synthetic long position), while shorting the underlying stock. As long as the put and call have the same underlying, strike price and expiration date, a synthetic long position will have the same risk/return profile as ownership of an equivalent amount of the underlying stock.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reverse Conversion'

In a typical reverse-conversion transaction, a brokerage firm short sells stock and hedges this position by buying its call and selling its put. Whether the brokerage firm makes money depends on the borrowing cost of the shorted stock and the put and call premiums, all of which may render a return better than the money market with very low risk. In the context of futures markets, a trader would be synthetically long and short the underlying futures while looking for arbitrage opportunities.

  1. Put-Call Parity

    A principle that defines the relationship between the price of ...
  2. Short Selling

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  3. Arbitrage

    The simultaneous purchase and sale of an asset in order to profit ...
  4. Expiration Date (Derivatives)

    The last day that an options or futures contract is valid. When ...
  5. Call Option

    An agreement that gives an investor the right (but not the obligation) ...
  6. Underlying

    1. In derivatives, the security that must be delivered when a ...
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