Reverse Leveraged Buyout

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DEFINITION of 'Reverse Leveraged Buyout'

The offering of shares to the public by a company that was taken private during a leveraged buyout. In the leveraged buyout, a private equity firm would have purchased the publicly traded company by borrowing heavily (using leverage) to purchase all the company's stock and using the target's assets as collateral.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reverse Leveraged Buyout'

After the LBO, the private equity firm repackages the company while it is privately owned and can't be as heavily scrutinized by the public. It then offers the company's shares for sale again in an RLBO. A number of academic research studies covering the period from 1980 to 2000 found that shares issued in RLBOs performed well after the IPO.

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