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What is a 'Reverse Takeover - RTO'

A reverse takeover (RTO) is a type of merger that private companies use become publicly traded without resorting to an initial public offering (IPO). Initially, the private company buys enough shares to control a publicly traded company. The private company's shareholder then uses its shares in the private company to exchange for shares in the public company. At this point, the private company has effectively become a publicly traded company. An RTO is also known as a reverse merger or a reverse IPO.

BREAKING DOWN 'Reverse Takeover - RTO'

With this type of merger, the private company does not need to pay the expensive fees associated with arranging an IPO. However, the company does not acquire any additional funds through the merger, and it must have enough funds to complete the transaction on its own.

While not a requirement of an RTO, the name of the publicly traded company involved is often changed as part of the process. Additionally, the corporate restructuring of one or both of the merging companies are adjusted to meet the new business design.

It is not uncommon for the publicly traded company to have had little, if any, recent activity, existing as more of a shell corporation. This allows the private company to shift its operations into the shell of the public entity with relative ease, all while avoiding the costs, regulatory requirements and time constraints associated with an IPO. While a traditional IPO may require months or years to complete, an RTO may be complete within weeks.

Using a Reverse Takeover to Access U.S. Markets

A foreign company may use an RTO as a mechanism to gain entry into the U.S. marketplace. If a business with operations based outside of the U.S. purchases enough shares to become a controlling interest in the U.S. company, it can move to merge the foreign-based business with the U.S.-based one, giving access to a new market without the costs traditionally involved.

To complete the process, the final resulting company must be able to meet all Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) reporting requirements and other regulatory standards, including the filing of an SEC Form 8-K to disclose the transaction.

Alternate Definition

A reverse takeover can also refer to an instance where a smaller company takes over a larger one. It is so named due to the fact that it is the lesser expected arrangement of the traditional takeover of a smaller business by a larger one.

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