Richard H. Anderson

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DEFINITION

Richard H. Anderson became the CEO of Delta Airlines in 2007. Born in 1956 in Texas, Anderson began his career in law, then worked at Continental Airlines, Northwest Airlines and UnitedHealth Group before joining Delta. He helped Northwest avoid filing for bankruptcy in the aftermath of 9/11 - though it ultimately filed in 2005. At Delta, Anderson replaced CEO Gerald Grinstein, under whom Delta filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2005.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

Founded in 1928, Delta is a major airline with destinations in more than 350 cities around the globe. Through numerous mergers and acquisitions, including a merger with Northwestern in 2008, Delta has grown considerably over the years. Other airlines that have become a part of Delta include Chicago and Southern Air Lines (1953), Northeast Airlines (1972), Republic Airlines (1986) and Pan Am (1991).


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