Riding the Yield Curve

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DEFINITION of 'Riding the Yield Curve'

A trading strategy that is based upon the yield curve and used for interest rate futures. Investors hope to achieve capital gains by employing this strategy.

BREAKING DOWN 'Riding the Yield Curve'

Traders riding the yield curve buy long term bonds with the hopes of making a profit as the yields fall with the declining maturity of the bonds.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What are the maximum Social Security disability benefits?

    The maximum Social Security disability benefit amount for a single eligible person in 2015 is $1,165 per month, but you can ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the relationship between the current yield and risk?

    The general relationship between current yield and risk is that they increase in correlation to one another. A higher current ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does the bond market react to changes in the Federal Funds Rate?

    The bond market is highly sensitive to changes in the federal funds rate. When the Federal Reserve increases the federal ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I use the holding period return yield to evaluate my bond portfolio?

    The holding period return yield formula can be used to compare the yields of different bonds in your portfolio over a given ... Read Full Answer >>

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