Right-Shoring

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DEFINITION of 'Right-Shoring'

The placement of a business' components and processes in localities and countries that provide the best combination of cost and efficiency. Right-shoring does not require a company to move business processes overseas. Rather, it is a strategy in which a business analyzes the complexity and importance of required tasks and entrusts their completion with the most suitable workforce, regardless of location.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Right-Shoring'

Right-shoring requires a business to maintain a balance between the work types that can be outsourced overseas and the ones that should be kept domestic. Commonly, less complex types of work and work that carries a lower level of importance can be shifted abroad, while complex and important types, or ones that require extensive customer interaction, are kept at home.

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