Rights Offering (Issue)

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DEFINITION of 'Rights Offering (Issue)'

An issue of rights to a company's existing shareholders that entitles them to buy additional shares directly from the company in proportion to their existing holdings, within a fixed time period. In a rights offering, the subscription price at which each share may be purchased in generally at a discount to the current market price. Rights are often transferable, allowing the holder to sell them on the open market.

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BREAKING DOWN 'Rights Offering (Issue)'

For example, a company whose stock is trading at $20 may announce a rights offering whereby its shareholders will be granted one right for each share held by them, with four rights required to buy each new share at a subscription price of $19. The company will also specify that the rights expire on a certain date, which is usually anywhere from one to three months from the date of announcement of the rights offering.

Companies typically issue rights to give their existing shareholders the opportunity to buy additional shares before other buyers, and also to enable current shareholders to maintain their proportionate stake in the company.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How are rights distributed in a rights offering?

    In a rights offering, rights are distributed to shareholders based on the number of shares they already own. What Is a Rights ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why would a company issue a rights offering?

    Companies most commonly issue a rights offering to raise additional capital. A company may need extra capital to meet its ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is a direct rights offering?

    A direct rights offering is an offer made by a company, directly to existing shareholders, granting them rights to purchase ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do I calculate the adjusted closing price for a stock?

    When trading is done for the day on a recognized exchange, all stocks are priced at close. The price that is quoted at the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some advantages of ordinary shares?

    Ordinary, or common, shares have many benefits for both the investor and the issuing company. For individuals, investing ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Preference shares, also known as preferred shares, have the advantage of a higher priority claim to the assets of a corporation ... Read Full Answer >>

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