Risk-On Risk-Off

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DEFINITION of 'Risk-On Risk-Off'

An investment setting in which price behavior responds to, and is driven by, changes in investor risk tolerance. Risk-on risk-off refers to changes in investment activity in response to global economic patterns. During periods when risk is perceived as low, risk-on risk-off theory states that investors tend to engage in higher-risk investments. When risk is perceived as high, investors have the tendency to gravitate toward lower-risk investments.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Risk-On Risk-Off'

Investors' appetites for risk rise and fall over time, and at times they are more likely to invest in higher-risk instruments than during other periods, such as during the 2009 recovery. The 2008 financial crisis was considered a "risk off" year, in which investors attempted to reduce risk by selling existing risky positions and moving money to either cash positions or low/no-risk positions, such as U.S. Treasury bonds.

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