Risk Participation

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DEFINITION of 'Risk Participation'

A type of off-balance-sheet transaction in which a bank sells its exposure to a contingent obligation, such as a banker's acceptance, to another financial institution. Risk participation allows banks to reduce their exposure to delinquencies, foreclosures, bankruptcies and company failures.

BREAKING DOWN 'Risk Participation'

Risk participation agreements are often used in international trade, but these agreements are risky because the participant has no contractual relationship with the borrower. On the upside, these transactions can help banks generate revenue streams and diversify their income sources.

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