Rival Good

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DEFINITION of 'Rival Good'

A type of good that may only be possessed or consumed by a single user. Using a rival good prevents its use by other possible users. Rival goods can be durable, where users may use them one at a time, or nondurable, where consumption destroys the good, allowing only one user to enjoy it.

BREAKING DOWN 'Rival Good'

Because these types of goods can only be used or occupied by one person, competition is created for their consumption. Consumers become rivals in an attempt to obtain these goods. For example, a skateboard represents a durable good because other consumers may use it after the current rider is finished. A nondurable good, such as a cup of coffee, will perish after consumption. Only one consumer will drink the coffee, and after it is gone, there will be nothing left for another consumer to use.

Non-rival goods are the opposite of rival goods. These goods allow consumption or possession to multiple users. National parks, roads and the Internet are examples of non-rival goods.

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