Rights of Accumulation - ROA

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DEFINITION of 'Rights of Accumulation - ROA'

A right that allows a shareholder to receive reduced sales charges when the amount of mutual funds purchased, plus the amount already held, equals an ROA breakpoint. In addition, there is no time limit on how long the mutual fund needs to be held to qualify for a ROA.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Rights of Accumulation - ROA'

For example: You wish to buy $2,000 of Fund ABC with a sales charge of 5.50% to add to your existing $19,000 of the same fund in your account. Given that Fund ABC is linked to an ROA and that the breakpoint is $20,000, you would qualify for a reduced sales charge (i.e. 5.25%). Also, the entire purchase ($2,000) would qualify for the reduced sales charge and not just the amount in excess of $20,000.

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