Robert A. Mundell


DEFINITION of 'Robert A. Mundell'

The winner of the 1999 Nobel Prize in Economics for his research on optimum currency areas and monetary dynamics. Mundell's areas of research have included macroeconomic theory, monetary policy, international trade theory and international capital flows. He is considered a founder of supply-side economics and he helped to develop the euro, the Mundell-Fleming model and the Mundell-Tobin effect.

BREAKING DOWN 'Robert A. Mundell'

Born in 1932 in Ontario, Mundell earned his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He became an economics professor at Columbia University, but earlier in his career, he taught at Stanford, Johns Hopkins and the University of Chicago and worked for the International Monetary Fund. Mundell has also been an economic advisor to numerous government organizations.

  1. Currency

    Currency is a generally accepted form of money, including coins ...
  2. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board ...
  3. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of standardizing ...
  4. Optimal Currency Area

    The geographic area in which a single currency would create the ...
  5. Fiscal Policy

    Government spending policies that influence macroeconomic conditions. ...
  6. Currency Band

    A currency system that establishes a trading range that a currency's ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    How Influential Economists Changed Our History

    Find out how these five groundbreaking thinkers laid our financial foundations.
  2. Economics

    What Is Fiscal Policy?

    Learn how governments adjust taxes and spending to moderate the economy.
  3. Economics

    Understanding Supply-Side Economics

    Does the amount of goods and services produced set the pace for economic growth? Here are the arguments.
  4. Personal Finance

    How The U.S. Government Formulates Monetary Policy

    Learn about the tools the Fed uses to influence interest rates and general economic conditions.
  5. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  6. Forex Education

    Global Trade And The Currency Market

    Learn how the Bretton Woods system got the ball rolling for world trade.
  7. Bonds & Fixed Income

    6 Factors That Influence Exchange Rates

    Find out how a currency's relative value reflects a country's economic health and impacts your investment returns.
  8. Investing

    The Hunger Games Economy: 5 Unanswered Questions About Panem

    The Hunger Games's fictitious nation of Panem has technology, black markets, and government. But, we know precious little about Panem's economy and the reasons for its rampant inequality.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Donald Trump's Stance on China

    Find out why China bothers Donald Trump so much, and why the 2016 Republican presidential candidate argues for a return to protectionist trade policies.
  10. Markets

    Will Paris Attacks Undo the European Union Dream?

    Last Friday's attacks in Paris are transforming the migrant crisis into an EU security threat, which could undermine the European Union dream.
  1. How do you make working capital adjustments in transfer pricing?

    Transfer pricing refers to prices that a multinational company or group charges a second party operating in a different tax ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Marginal propensity to Consume (MPC) Vs. Save (MPS)

    Historically, because people in the United States have shown a higher propensity to consume, this is likely the more important ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do lower interest rates increase investment spending?

    Lower Interest rates encourage additional investment spending, which gives the economy a boost in times of slow economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Who decides to print money in Russia?

    The Central Bank of the Russian Federation (CBRF), like its peers in most countries, is the governmental entity responsible ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who decides to print money in Canada?

    In Canada, new money comes from two places: the Bank of Canada (BOC) and chartered banks such as the Toronto Dominion Bank ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who decides when to print money in India?

    The Reserve Bank of India, or RBI, manages currency in India. The bank's additional responsibilities include regulating the ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Barefoot Pilgrim

    A slang term for an unsophisticated investor who loses all of his or her wealth by trading equities in the stock market. ...
  2. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  3. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  4. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  5. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  6. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
Trading Center