Robert A. Mundell

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DEFINITION of 'Robert A. Mundell'

The winner of the 1999 Nobel Prize in Economics for his research on optimum currency areas and monetary dynamics. Mundell's areas of research have included macroeconomic theory, monetary policy, international trade theory and international capital flows. He is considered a founder of supply-side economics and he helped to develop the euro, the Mundell-Fleming model and the Mundell-Tobin effect.

BREAKING DOWN 'Robert A. Mundell'

Born in 1932 in Ontario, Mundell earned his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He became an economics professor at Columbia University, but earlier in his career, he taught at Stanford, Johns Hopkins and the University of Chicago and worked for the International Monetary Fund. Mundell has also been an economic advisor to numerous government organizations.

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