Robust

What does 'Robust' mean

Robust is a characteristic describing a model's, test's or system's ability to effectively perform while its variables or assumptions are altered. A robust concept can operate without failure under a variety of conditions.

BREAKING DOWN 'Robust'

Robustness can relate to both economic and statistical concepts. For statistics, a test is claimed as robust if it still provides insight to a problem despite having its assumptions altered or violated. In economics, robustness is attributed to financial markets that continue to perform despite alterations in market conditions. In general, being robust means a system can handle variability and remain effective.

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