DEFINITION of 'Rollout'

A slang term for the introduction of a new product or service to the market. A rollout often refers to a significant product release, often accompanied by a strong marketing campaign to generate a large amount of consumer hype.


Rollout can also refer to the methodology behind a product's introduction. For example, some electronic companies follow a rollout strategy of keeping new products or ideas top secret until just before release.

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