Routing Transit Number - RTN

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DEFINITION of 'Routing Transit Number - RTN'

A nine-digit numerical code used to identify a banking or other financial institution to clear funds or process checks in the U.S. The routing transit number, as it appears on a check, specifically denotes the banking institution that holds the account in which funds from the check are to be drawn.


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Routing Transit Number - RTN'

The first four digits of any RTN code will designate the Federal Reserve Bank of the district where the institution is located. The next four digits denote the bank itself, while the last digit is a classifier for the check or negotiable instrument.

RTN numbers are often used when setting up a wire transfer or direct deposit relationship with one's personal or business bank.


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