Rule 144A

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What is the 'Rule 144A'

A Securities & Exchange Commission rule modifying a two-year holding period requirement on privately placed securities to permit qualified institutional buyers to trade these positions among themselves.

BREAKING DOWN 'Rule 144A'

This has substantially increased the liquidity of the securities affected because institutions can trade these securities amongst themselves, side-stepping limitations that are imposed to protect the public.

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