Russell 3000 Index


DEFINITION of 'Russell 3000 Index'

A market capitalization weighted equity index maintained by the Russell Investment Group that seeks to be a benchmark of the entire U.S. stock market. More specifically, this index encompasses the 3,000 largest U.S.-traded stocks, in which the underlying companies are all incorporated in the U.S.

BREAKING DOWN 'Russell 3000 Index'

Stocks within the Russell 3000 index are reconstituted once a year (typically around May or June). At this time, the underlying companies are reranked based on their market capitalizations for that year. Furthermore, if a member is somehow rendered ineligible for continued membership during the year (such as by going private, being acquired or going bankrupt), no replacement is named until the next scheduled reconstitution.

Of the 3,000 stocks in the index, there are two very popular sub indexes that are followed to track the progress of the market. The largest 1,000 stocks become the Russell 1000 index (large cap index) and the subsequent 2,000 are known as the Russell 2000 index (small-cap index).

  1. S&P/ASX 200 Index

    The benchmark stock index for the Austrailian markets. It was ...
  2. Large Cap - Big Cap

    A term used by the investment community to refer to companies ...
  3. Russell 2000 Index

    An index measuring the performance approximately 2,000 small-cap ...
  4. Market Capitalization

    The total dollar market value of all of a company's outstanding ...
  5. Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index ...

    A market capitalization-weighted index composed of more than ...
  6. Index Fund

    An index fund is a type of mutual fund with a portfolio constructed ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    An Introduction To Stock Market Indexes

    Investopedia explains the five most talked about indexes and what makes them all different.
  2. Economics

    The ABCs Of Stock Indexes

    Indexes can track market trends, but they're not always reliable. Can you trust them?
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Index Investing

    Get to know the most important market indices and the pros and cons of investing in them.
  4. Investing Basics

    3 Key Signs Of A Market Top

    When stocks rise or fall, the financial fate of investors change, as well. There are certain signs that can reveal a stock’s course, and investors don’t need to be experts to spot them.
  5. Investing

    Asset Manager Ethics: Rules Governing Capital Markets

    The integrity of the capital markets needs to be kept at utmost importance for all investors. This article shows how to maintain the integrity while investing.
  6. Investing News

    Understand the SEC Rules on Equity Crowdfunding

    The SEC's adoption of equity crowdfunding rules, initiated under the JOBS Act, enables small investors to invest in companies that show early potential.
  7. Investing Basics

    Tax-Efficient Strategies For International Clients

    In a globalized world, international clients seek to diversify holdings by accessing U.S. markets. Creative strategies will help optimize tax positioning.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: Guggenheim Russell Top 50 Mega Cap

    Find out about the Guggenheim Russell Top 50 Index ETF, and read about some recommendations regarding the suitability of this investment.
  9. Investing Basics

    What Happens in a Haircut?

    One meaning of haircut is the difference between prices at which a market maker can buy and sell a security.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    ETF Analysis: PowerShares FTSE RAFI US 1000

    Find out about the PowerShares FTSE RAFI U.S. 1000 ETF, and explore detailed analysis of the fund that invests in undervalued stocks.
  1. Why would a corporation issue convertible bonds?

    A convertible bond represents a hybrid security that has bond and equity features; this type of bond allows the conversion ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between shares outstanding and floating stock?

    Shares outstanding and floating stock are different measures of the shares of a particular stock. Shares outstanding is the ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between market risk premium and equity risk premium?

    The only meaningful difference between market-risk premium and equity-risk premium is scope. Both terms refer to the same ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between the QQQ ETF and other indexes?

    QQQ, previously QQQQ, is unlike indexes because it is an exchange-traded fund (ETF) that tracks the Nasdaq 100 Index. The ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between an investment and a retail bank?

    The activities and types of clients for an investment bank versus those for a retail bank highlight the primary difference ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Will technology ever disrupt the role of the custodian bank?

    Custodian banks, along with other financial institutions that hold custodian accounts, are likely to be disrupted but not ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  2. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  3. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  4. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  5. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
  6. Cost Of Funds

    The interest rate paid by financial institutions for the funds that they deploy in their business. The cost of funds is one ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!