Russell Midcap Index

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Russell Midcap Index'

A market capitalization weighted index representing the smallest 800 companies in the Russell 1000 Index. The average Russell Midcap Index member has a market cap of $8 billion to $10 billion, with a median value of $4 billion to $5 billion. The index is reconstituted annually so that stocks that have outgrown the index can be removed and new entries can be added.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Russell Midcap Index'

The Russell Midcap Index is a complete subset of both the Russell 1000 and the Russell 3000. Midcap fund managers have few good indexes against which to benchmark their returns, making the Russell Midcap Index a valuable one for institutional portfolio managers. The range of market caps covered in this 800-member index goes from about $1 billion on the low end to roughly $20 billion.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Russell 2000 Index

    An index measuring the performance approximately 2,000 small-cap ...
  2. Russell Microcap Index

    A capitalization weighted index of 2,000 small cap and micro ...
  3. Mid Cap

    A company with a market capitalization between $2 and $10 billion.
  4. Institutional Investor

    A non-bank person or organization that trades securities in large ...
  5. Style Box

    Created by Morningstar, a style box is designed to visually represent ...
  6. Russell 2500 Index

    A broad index featuring 2,500 stocks that cover the small and ...
Related Articles
  1. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Which Mutual Fund Market Cap Suits You?

    Different funds invest in companies with different market caps. Find out which is right for you.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Understanding The Mutual Fund Style Box

    Evaluate your investments with this simple tool.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Index Investing

    Get to know the most important market indices and the pros and cons of investing in them.
  4. Economics

    Understanding Perpetuity

    Perpetuity means without end. In finance, a perpetuity is a flow of money that will be received on a regular basis without a specified ending date.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    What is a Null Hypothesis?

    In statistics, a null hypothesis is assumed true until proven otherwise.
  6. Chart Advisor

    Time To Rebalance? These ETFs Say So

    Caution ahead: 2014 has been very good to U.S. large-cap indexes, but lagging commodities and funds holding mid- to small-caps point to a slowdown.
  7. Economics

    How A Limited Government Affects A Country's Finances

    Countries with limited governments have fewer laws about what individuals and businesses can and can’t do. What's the net result?
  8. Investing Basics

    How Does Goodwill Affect Financial Statements?

    Goodwill is a bit of a paradox--intangible, yet it is recorded as an asset on the purchasing company's balance sheet.
  9. Investing Basics

    Using Normal Distribution Formula To Optimize Your Portfolio

    Normal or bell curve distribution can be used in portfolio theory to help portfolio managers maximize return and minimize risk.
  10. Investing Basics

    R-Squared

    Learn more about this statistical measurement used to represent movement between a security and its benchmark.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
  2. Hurdle Rate

    The minimum rate of return on a project or investment required by a manager or investor. In order to compensate for risk, ...
  3. Market Value

    The price an asset would fetch in the marketplace. Market value is also commonly used to refer to the market capitalization ...
  4. Preference Shares

    Company stock with dividends that are paid to shareholders before common stock dividends are paid out. In the event of a ...
  5. Accrued Interest

    1. A term used to describe an accrual accounting method when interest that is either payable or receivable has been recognized, ...
  6. Absorption Costing

    A managerial accounting cost method of expensing all costs associated with manufacturing a particular product. Absorption ...
Trading Center