Rust Belt

Dictionary Says

Definition of 'Rust Belt'


A slang term for a geographic region in the United States stretching from New York through the Midwest that was once involved in steel production and manufacturing. The Rust Belt became an industrial hub due to its proximity to the Great Lakes, canals and rivers, which allowed companies to gain access to raw materials and ship out finished products. This region is called the Rust Belt because the decline in industrial work has left many factories abandoned and uncared for, rusting due to their exposure to the elements. It has also been referred to as the manufacturing belt as well as the factory belt.
Investopedia Says

Investopedia explains 'Rust Belt'


Some of America's more prominent industries, such as steel production and automobile manufacturing, were located in the Rust Belt area. They have declined over the years due to the increased cost of domestic labor and the capital intensive nature of manufacturing. Blue collar jobs have moved overseas more and more, forcing local governments to rethink the type of manufacturing and businesses that can profitably operate in the area. The Rust Belt generally begins in central New York and runs west through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan and northern Illinois and Indiana.
comments powered by Disqus
Hot Definitions
  1. Valuation

    The process of determining the current worth of an asset or company. There are many techniques that can be used to determine value, some are subjective and others are objective.
  2. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  3. Tech Street

    A term used in the financial markets and the press to refer to the technology sector. Companies like Intel, Microsoft, Apple and Dell are all considered to be part of Tech Street.
  4. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  5. Momentum Investing

    An investment strategy that aims to capitalize on the continuance of existing trends in the market. The momentum investor believes that large increases in the price of a security will be followed by additional gains and vice versa for declining values.
  6. IPO ETF

    An exchange-traded fund that focuses on stocks that have recently held an initial public offering (IPO). The underlying indexes tracked by IPO ETFs vary from one fund manager to another, but index IPO ETFs are usually passively managed and contain equities that have recently been offered to the public.
Trading Center