Receive Versus Payment - RVP

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DEFINITION of 'Receive Versus Payment - RVP'

A settlement procedure in which an institutional sell order is accompanied by the requirement that cash only be accepted in exchange for delivery upon settlement of the financial transaction. Receive versus payment provisions arose when institutions were prohibited from paying money for securities until they held the securities and they were in negotiable form.


Also called receive against payment (RAP).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Receive Versus Payment - RVP'

A significant source of credit risk in securities settlement is the principal risk associated with the settlement date. The idea behind the receive versus payment/delivery versus payment system is that part of that risk can be removed if the settlement procedure ensures that delivery occurs only if payment occurs (in other words, that securities are not delivered prior to the exchange of payment for the securities). The system helps ensure that payments accompany deliveries, thereby reducing principal risk, reducing the chance that deliveries or payments would be withheld during periods of stress in the financial markets and reducing liquidity risk.

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