S-8 Filing

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DEFINITION of 'S-8 Filing'

A SEC filing required for companies wishing to issue equity to their employees.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'S-8 Filing'

Similar to filing a prospectus, the S-8 outlines the details of an internal issuing of stock or options to employees.

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