Form S-4

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Form S-4'

A form that must be submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission in the event of a merger or an acquisition between two companies. The form must also be submitted for exchange offers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Form S-4'

An exchange offer occurs when a company or a financial institution offers to exchange securities that it provides for similar securities at less demanding terms. This is often done in an attempt to avoid bankruptcy.

Submissions of this form are closely watched by investors who attempt to make quick gains from M&A activity.


RELATED TERMS
  1. 8-K

    A report of unscheduled material events or corporate changes ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. 10-K

    A comprehensive summary report of a company's performance that ...
  4. Schedule 13D

    A form that must be filed with the SEC under Rule 13D. The form ...
  5. Securities Act Of 1933

    A federal piece of legislation enacted as a result of the market ...
  6. SEC Form 10-Q

    A comprehensive report of a company's performance that must be ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some common accretive transactions?

    The term "accretive" is most often used in reference to mergers and acquisitions (M&A). It refers to a transaction that ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some ways to make a distribution channel more efficient?

    While there are many ways to make a distribution channel more efficient, the three high-level ways to increase the efficiency ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is a tender offer used by an individual, group or company seeking to purchase ...

    A tender offer is made directly to shareholders in a publicly traded company to gain enough shares to force a sale of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does a company record profits using the equity method?

    A company that invests in another company and has majority control of it would record profits using the equity method. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does horizontal integration allow companies to share resources?

    In a horizontal integration, a company either acquires another company or merges with that company. This allows the resulting ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Reg AC: What Does It Mean To Investors?

    In 2003, the SEC issued a new regulation meant to hold analysts more accountable for their reports. Find out what it means.
  2. Trading Strategies

    The Daily Routine Of A Swing Trader

    From pre-market to after hours, see what you need to do to capture gains quickly.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Options & Futures

    The Basics Of Mergers And Acquisitions

    Learn what corporate restructuring is, why companies do it and why it sometimes doesn't work.
  5. Investing

    Top Tips on Catering to Millennial Clients

    The economic impact of Millennials is rapidly growing. Here's how to reach them.
  6. Investing

    What Can A Conference Call Tell About Trends?

    Messages in a company conference call can be easily misconstrued. But there is a way to cut through the talking points to get to the real substance.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Which US Airlines Are Poised For Long-Term Gains?

    The US airline industry has undergone a dramatic transformation since the last bear market, with one or two carriers likely to outperform in coming years.
  8. Stock Analysis

    The Delhaize/Ahold Merger: A Buy for Investors?

    The mid-2016 merger of Delhaize Group and Ahold NV will create a supermarket giant, but what will it mean from an investing perspective?
  9. Investing Basics

    Understanding Related-Party Transactions

    In business, a related-party transaction refers to a transaction where parties on both sides have a common interest or relationship.
  10. Economics

    Understanding Organizational Behavior

    Organizational behavior is the study of how humans interact in group environments.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  2. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  3. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  4. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  5. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  6. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!