Safe Asset

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DEFINITION of 'Safe Asset'

Assets which, in and of themselves, do not carry a high likelihood of lawsuit risk. Mere ownership of this type of asset does not expose the asset owner to a significant risk of litigation.

Assets such as stocks, mutual funds, bonds, bank accounts and your personal residence are examples of safe assets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Safe Asset'

The distinction between safe assets and dangerous assets is particularly important in asset-protection planning. Mixing the two could cause contamination of the safe assets by being housed in an investment vehicle with dangerous assets. Safe assets, due to the relatively low degree of litigation risk involved with their ownership, can be owned together with other safe assets. However, safe assets are also more vulnerable to creditor seizure to satisfy a debt or judgment.

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