Safe Asset

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Safe Asset'

Assets which, in and of themselves, do not carry a high likelihood of lawsuit risk. Mere ownership of this type of asset does not expose the asset owner to a significant risk of litigation.

Assets such as stocks, mutual funds, bonds, bank accounts and your personal residence are examples of safe assets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Safe Asset'

The distinction between safe assets and dangerous assets is particularly important in asset-protection planning. Mixing the two could cause contamination of the safe assets by being housed in an investment vehicle with dangerous assets. Safe assets, due to the relatively low degree of litigation risk involved with their ownership, can be owned together with other safe assets. However, safe assets are also more vulnerable to creditor seizure to satisfy a debt or judgment.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Estate Planning

    The collection of preparation tasks that serve to manage an individual's ...
  2. Creditor

    An entity (person or institution) that extends credit by giving ...
  3. Irrevocable Trust

    A trust that can't be modified or terminated without the permission ...
  4. Punitive Damages

    Legal recompense that is levied as punishment for a wrong or ...
  5. Limited Recourse Debt

    A debt in which the creditor has limited claims on the loan in ...
  6. Family Limited Partnership - FLP

    A type of partnership designed to centralize family business ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are so-called self-offering and self-management covered by "Financial Instruments ...

    As the Financial Services Agency (FSA) explains, self-offering of interests in collective investment schemes falls under ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What happens when I want to sell my A-shares of a mutual fund?

    Typically, commissions or other sales charges may apply when a mutual fund is sold. This is an important factor in deciding ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does the information ratio tell about the design of a mutual fund?

    The information ratio can tell an investor how well a mutual fund is designed to deliver excess or abnormal returns as well ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is it better to buy A-shares or a no-load mutual fund?

    Mutual funds and other pooled investments are popular among investors because they provide a level of diversity and professional ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Are Class A mutual funds a better choice for long-term investments or short-term ...

    A shares are a particular class of mutual funds available to investors, usually through financial advisers. This class of ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the best free online resources to compare no-load mutual funds?

    Morningstar, Inc. is a well-known investment research firm that offers extensive market data and stock and mutual fund analysis. ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Moving Retirement Plan Assets: How To Avoid Mistakes

    Sometimes things go wrong in a simple transfer of funds. Make sure you know how to avoid penalties.
  2. Entrepreneurship

    Don't Get Sued: 5 Tips To Protect Your Small Business

    Find out what you can do to limit risk and keep your business running smoothly.
  3. Investing Basics

    Do You Understand Investment Risk?

    Many investors overestimate their level of financial knowledge.
  4. Retirement

    6 Estate Planning Must-Haves

    You need an estate plan even if you don't have significant assets. Learn what you need to include in yours.
  5. Retirement

    Establishing A Revocable Living Trust

    This arrangement allows you to have more control over your estate - both before and after your death.
  6. Options & Futures

    Asset Protection For The Business Owner

    Could incorporating your business help protect it? Find out here.
  7. Retirement

    Saving Money With A Private Annuity Trust

    Learn about a strategy that could help you reduce taxes, diversify your portfolio and generate income.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding the Profitability Index

    The profitability index (PI) is a modification of the net present value method of assessing an investment’s attractiveness.
  9. Economics

    What is Neoliberalism?

    Neoliberalism is a little-used term to describe an economy where the government has few, if any, controls on economic factors.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Monte Carlo Simulation

    Monte Carlo simulation is an analysis done by running a number of different variables through a model in order to determine the different outcomes.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. American Dream

    The belief that anyone, regardless of where they were born or what class they were born into, can attain their own version ...
  2. Multicurrency Note Facility

    A credit facility that finances short- to medium-term Euro notes. Multicurrency note facilities are denominated in many currencies. ...
  3. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  4. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  5. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  6. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!