Sales Per Share


DEFINITION of 'Sales Per Share'

A ratio that computes the total revenue earned per share over a 12-month period. It is calculated by dividing total revenue earned in a fiscal year by the weighted average of shares outstanding for that fiscal year:

Sales Per Share

Also known as "revenue per share".

BREAKING DOWN 'Sales Per Share'

The sales-per-share ratio is used to evaluate a company's business activities in comparison to share price. The higher the ratio, the more active the company.

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