Sampling

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DEFINITION of 'Sampling'

A process used in statistical analysis in which a predetermined number of observations will be taken from a larger population. The methodology used to sample from a larger population will depend on the type of analysis being performed, but will include simple random sampling, systematic sampling and observational sampling.

The sample should be a representation of the general population.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sampling'

When taking a sample from a larger population, it is important to consider how the sample will be drawn. To get a representative sample, the sample must be drawn randomly and encompass the entire population. For example, a lottery system could be used to determine the average age of students in a University by sampling 10% of the student body, taking an equal number of students from each faculty.

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