What is a 'Samurai Bond'

A samurai bond is a yen-denominated bond issued in Tokyo by a non-Japanese company and subject to Japanese regulations. Other types of yen-denominated bonds are Euroyens issued in countries other than Japan.

BREAKING DOWN 'Samurai Bond'

Samurai bonds give issuers the ability to access investment capital available in Japan. The proceeds from the issuance of samurai bonds can be used by non-Japanese companies to break into the Japanese market, or it can be converted into the issuing company's local currency to be used on existing operations. Samurai bonds can also be used to hedge foreign exchange rate risk.

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