Sanford J. Grossman

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DEFINITION of 'Sanford J. Grossman'

An American economist and CEO of the hedge fund Quantitative Financial Strategies (QFS), which he founded in 1988. Sanford Jay Grossman was born in 1953 in New York City and holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. He has held academic appointments at Princeton, been an economics professor at the University of Chicago and held the position of Steinberg Trustee Professor of Finance at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sanford J. Grossman'

Dr. Grossman's areas of expertise include corporate structure, risk management, securities markets and property rights. He won the John Bates Clark Medal in 1987. QFS hedge fund implements a variety of investment strategies through its currency program, macro program, fixed income program and portable alpha program.

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