Satisficing

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DEFINITION

A decision-making strategy that aims for a satisfactory or adequate result, rather than the optimal solution. This is because aiming for the optimal solution may necessitate needless expenditure of time, energy and resources. The term "satisfice" was coined by American scientist and Noble-laureate Herbert Simon in 1956.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The theory of satisficing finds application in a number of fields including economics, artificial intelligence and sociology. Satisficing implies that a consumer, when confronted with a plethora of choices for a specific need, will select a product or service that is "good enough", rather than expending effort and resources on finding the best possible or optimal choice.


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