Saver's Tax Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Saver's Tax Credit'

A non-refundable tax credit available to lower income individuals and households that contribute to qualified retirement savings plans. This includes employer-sponsored plans such as 401(k), SIMPLE and SEP plans, or the governmental 457 plan, along with contributions to Traditional and Roth IRAs. The amount of the credit will depend on the adjusted gross income of the individual or household and the size of the contribution.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Saver's Tax Credit'

A taxpayer must be at least 18 years old to be eligible for the credit. Individuals that are full-time students, were full-time students for at least five months of the year, or filed as dependents are not eligible.

The maximum contribution amount to which this credit can be applied is $2,000. For households with an adjusted gross income of $30,000 and under ($22,500 for individuals) the credit rate is 50%. Households with an adjusted gross income of between $30,001 and $32,500 ($22,501 – $24,375 for individuals) the credit rate is 20%. For households earning an adjusted gross income of $32,501 to $50,000 ($24,376 – $37,500 for individuals) the credit rate is 10%. For example, an individual earning $22,900 who contributes $2,000 to a retirement plan will receive a tax credit of $400 ($2,000 x 20%).

Any amount above the 10% credit rate limits are not eligible for this tax credit.

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