Schedule L

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DEFINITION of 'Schedule L'

A form attached to Form 1040 that is used to calculate the standard deduction for certain tax filers. Schedule L is only used by taxpayers who are increasing their standard deduction by reporting state or local real estate taxes, taxes from the purchase of a new motor vehicle or from a net disaster loss reported on Form 4684.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Schedule L'

Refunds and rebates already received on real estate taxes reduce the amount of additional standard deduction for which a taxpayer may be eligible. With regards to motor vehicles, taxpayers in states that do not charge sales tax but levy another fee on the purchase of a new vehicle can treat those fees as a tax for the purpose of this form.


Taxpayers should check to see if an increased standard deduction will provide the same tax benefit as itemizing deductions.

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