Schedule 14D-9F

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Schedule 14D-9F'

This schedule may be used by a Canadian foreign private issuer or by any of its directors or officers when the issuer is the subject of a tender offer filed on Schedule 14D-1F. Schedule 14D-9F is used to respond to tender offers made for the company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Schedule 14D-9F'

According to the SEC, this schedule serves as a "wraparound" for all the relevant Canadian disclosure documents. In addition, the filer must comply with all relevant Canadian requirements for tender offers.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  2. Canadian Securities Administrators ...

    A collective forum composed of all the provincial and territorial ...
  3. Securities Exchange Act Of 1934

    The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 was created to provide governance ...
  4. Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis ...

    The electronic filing system created by the Securities and Exchange ...
  5. Securities Act Of 1933

    A federal piece of legislation enacted as a result of the market ...
  6. Contra Proferentem Rule

    A rule in contract law which states that any clause considered ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How are asset management firms regulated?

    In principle, the asset management industry is largely governed by two bodies: the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What information should I focus on in my mutual fund's prospectus?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) requires investment companies to provide potential and current investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I get a free mutual fund prospectus?

    Mutual funds are sold via prospectus, as mandated by the Securities Act of 1933. The prospectus document outlines many features ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is there an index for tracking mid-cap stocks?

    There are several indexes for tracking mid-cap stocks. The most widely referenced is the S&P Mid-Cap 400, but others ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What information does the SEC require in an investment company's prospectus?

    A prospectus is the document provided by registered investment companies to investors that is meant to assist them in making ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between a summary prospectus and an offering memorandum?

    All securities offered to investors in the United States are required to comply with the anti-fraud provisions of federal ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Pay Attention To The Proxy Statement

    Don't overlook this overview of a company's well-being.
  2. Investing Basics

    Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder

    We delve into common stock owners' privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
  3. Economics

    What is a Capital Account?

    Capital account is an economic term that refers to the net change in investment and asset ownership for a nation.
  4. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    U.S. Investors Are Seeking Opportunities Overseas

    A latest analysis leads to believe that many investors are applying a spring cleaning approach to their portfolios, rebalancing as the 1st quarter ended.
  5. Investing

    Three Portfolio Moves To Consider Now

    What portfolio moves should you consider making as the 2nd quarter kicks off? Before we focus on the future, let’s first reflect on the 1st Q surprises.
  6. Investing

    Pockets Of Value In The Stock Market

    U.S. stocks benefited from signs the Fed’s path toward higher interest rates, as well as from continued merger-and-acquisition activity on of low rates.
  7. Economics

    Can The U.S Close Its Trade Deficit?

    The stronger dollar could have increased the U.S. trade deficit. Instead, economic growth issues abroad and falling oil prices have helped shrink it.
  8. Economics

    What is a Nostro Account?

    A nostro account is a bank account held in a foreign country by a domestic bank, denominated in the currency of that country.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is a Foreign Institutional Investor?

    A foreign institutional investor (FII) is a person or a group of people operating or registered in a country that’s not their domicile.
  10. Economics

    Where To Search For Yield Today

    It’s hard to miss that there has been a pronounced slowdown in the U.S. economy this year.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center