Schedule A

DEFINITION of 'Schedule A'

Schedule A is a U.S. income tax form that is used by taxpayers to report itemized deductions, which can help reduce an individual's federal tax liability

BREAKING DOWN 'Schedule A'

The Schedule A form is attached as an optional supplement to the standard 1040 form for U.S. taxpayers paying annual income taxes. Itemized deductions serve as an alternative to claiming a standard deduction for tax returns, and the individual taxpayer can apply for deductions with whichever option will elicit the biggest returns. Like the standard tax returns, itemized deductions are subtracted from the adjusted gross income (AGI) to arrive at an individual's taxable income. Schedule A forms allow taxpayers to itemize taxes within seven designated categories:

  • Medical and Dental Expenses
  • Taxes You Paid
  • Interest You Paid
  • Gifts to Charity
  • Casualty and Theft Losses
  • Job Expenses and Certain Miscellaneous Deductions
  • Other Miscellaneous Deductions

The Schedule A also comes with detailed instructions explaining which of your expenses are deductible and where you should list them on the form.  

Most taxpayers do not itemize their deductions, electing instead to file at the standard deduction rate in which the taxpayer simply subtracts the standard deductions for their filing status to reach their AGI. For most taxpayers, it doesn't help the bottom line to personally itemize their potentially deductible expenses, and it saves them the trouble of keeping track of every possible deductible expense over the course of a year.

If you do choose to itemize your deductions, make sure to have documentation of your deductible payments: receipts, invoices, check stubs, etc. Furthermore, the standard deduction rate cannot be adjusted once an individual's tax returns have been filed, unless a taxpayer's filing status changes. Itemized deductions, however are subject to adjustment by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), so applying with the standard deduction rate is predictable.

Generally speaking, individuals on higher tax brackets have more to gain from itemizing their deductions. For example, many people list interest on a mortgage payment as a large deductible in the "interest you paid" section. Obviously, a wealthier homeowner will have paid more interest on their home than a poorer one.

For many taxpayers, mortgage interest is a good benchmark for deciding whether or not to use the standard deduction. If your annual mortgage interest (which should be made available to you by your bank) is higher than the standard deduction rate (which in 2014 was $6,200), it is already to your advantage to itemize deductions into of filing for the standard deduction for your tax bracket.  

Gifts to charity, another deductible expense, are also more likely to occur amongst individuals in higher income brackets. However, many potential deductible expenses – like medical payments, unreimbursed income sustained as an employee, or uninsured asset loss due to theft or destruction – are unpredictable, and each taxpayer should decide how to calculate their tax deductions on a yearly basis.

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