Schedule TO-I

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DEFINITION of 'Schedule TO-I'

This schedule is known as an "issuer tender offer statement." It must be filed by certain reporting companies that make tender offers for their own securities – a "self-tender." In addition, Rule 13e-4, under the 1934 Act, imposes added requirements that an issuer must comply with when it is making an issuer tender offer. This schedule replaced Schedule 13e-4 as of January, 2000.

BREAKING DOWN 'Schedule TO-I'

A tender offer is a public offer to buy some or all of the shares in a corporation from the existing shareholders made by either the company itself or buy interested outside parties. These offers are normally made at a premium to the current price of the stock. Any entity acquiring more than 5% of an existing registered public company must file a 13D with the SEC.

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