Supply Chain Management - SCM

Loading the player...

What is 'Supply Chain Management - SCM'

Supply chain management (SCM) is the active streamlining of a business' supply-side activities to maximize customer value and gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace. SCM represents an effort by suppliers to develop and implement supply chains that are as efficient and economical as possible. Supply chains cover everything from production, to product development, to the information systems needed to direct these undertakings.

BREAKING DOWN 'Supply Chain Management - SCM'

Typically, SCM attempts to centrally control or link the production, shipment and distribution of a product. By managing the supply chain, companies are able to cut excess costs and deliver products to the consumer faster. This is done by keeping tighter control of internal inventories, internal production, distribution, sales and the inventories of company vendors. SCM is based on the idea that nearly every product that comes to market results from the efforts of various organizations that make up a supply chain. Although supply chains have existed for ages, most companies have only recently paid attention to them as a value-add to their operations.

Supply Chain

A supply chain is the connected network of individuals, organizations, resources, activities and technologies involved in the manufacture and sale of a product or service. A supply chain starts with the delivery of raw material from a supplier to a manufacturer, and ends with the delivery of the finished product or service to the end consumer. SCM oversees each touch point of a company's product or service, from initial creation to final sale. With so many places along the supply chain that can add value through efficiencies or lose value through increased expenses, proper SCM can increase revenues, decrease costs and impact a company's bottom line.

Example of SCM

Understanding the importance of SCM to its business, Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc. has placed focused effort on transforming its supply chain in 2016. The company operates the second largest pharmaceutical chain in the United States and needs to efficiently manage and revise its supply chain so it stays ahead of the changing trends and continues to add value to its bottom line.

As of July 5, 2016, Walgreens has invested in the technology portion of its supply chain. It implemented a forward-looking SCM that synthesizes relevant data and uses analytics to forecast customer purchase behavior, and then works its way backward up the supply chain to meet that expected demand. For example, the company can anticipate flu patterns, which allow it to accurately forecast needed inventory for over-the-counter flu remedies, creating an efficient supply chain with little waste. Using this SCM, the company can reduce excess inventory and all of the inventories' associated costs, such as the cost of warehousing and transportation.

Trading Center