Scope

DEFINITION of 'Scope'

A project management term for the combined objectives and requirements necessary to complete a project. Properly defining the scope of a project allows a manager to estimate costs and the time required to finish the project.

BREAKING DOWN 'Scope'

Scope can involve a variety of things, depending on the type of project. For example, if the project was to design an airplane, the scope could include the functional requirements of the plane, such as how many passengers it can carry or how fast it should be able to travel.

It is the responsibility of the project manager to ensure that the scope's deadlines are met, allowing for smooth completion of the project. This may be sidetracked by scope creep, which occurs when the project gains additional features or requirements without extending the deadline.

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