Scrip

What is a 'Scrip'

A scrip is a written document that acknowledges a debt.

2. A temporary document representing a fraction of a share resulting from a split or spin-off. Scrips may be applied to the purchase of full shares.

3. Currency issued by a private corporation

BREAKING DOWN 'Scrip'

1. Historically, companies short of cash have paid scrip dividends instead of cash dividends.

3. An example would be frequent flier miles.

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