Seasoned Issue

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DEFINITION of 'Seasoned Issue'

An issue of additional securities from an established company whose securities already trade in the secondary market. A seasoned issue is also known as a "seasoned equity offering" or "follow-on offering." New shares issued by blue-chip companies are considered seasoned issues. Outstanding bonds trading in secondary markets are also called seasoned issues.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Seasoned Issue'

Seasoned issues are handled by underwriting firms in much the same way as initial public offerings, except that the price of the new shares is based on the market price of the outstanding shares. Investors may construe a seasoned issue as a sign that a company is having financial problems. This news can cause the price of both the outstanding shares and the new shares to fall.

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