SEC Form 1-N

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form 1-N'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the Registration as a National Securities Exchange for Futures Trading. It is used by parties who wish to establish an exchange for trading futures. SEC Form 1-N is one of the most complex filing forms used by the SEC, as it requires extensive disclosures.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form 1-N'

While most investors will never have a reason to examine a SEC Form 1-N, those wishing to truly understand the inner workings of the futures and commodities markets depend on it. The SEC Form 1-N is one of the best sources of information as to who the key players are behind an exchange.

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