SEC Form 10-12G


DEFINITION of 'SEC Form 10-12G'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), also known as the "Initial Form for General Registration of Securities", required when a publicly traded corporation issues new shares of a company's stock. SEC Form 10-12G contains information about the number of shares issued, their par value, ownership information for key shareholders and executives, and specific information about the company's line of business.


SEC Form 10-12G is one of the starting points for anyone wishing to truly research a company's stock. Contained on this form is information that can provide key insights into a management team's long-term direction for a company and assessment of potential risks and opportunities in their industry. Of additional interest to many investors is the fact that SEC Form 10-12G contains a breakdown of shares owned by company officers, giving insight into possible conflicts of interest underlying different executives' decisions.

Related Forms: SEC Forms 10-12B/A, 10-12G, 10-12G/A

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