SEC Form 24F-1

DEFINITION of 'SEC Form 24F-1'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that is required when an investment company sells more shares than its initial registration filing had stated. This form is also known as the Notice of Election of Retroactive Registration. Information on this form includes the number of shares to be retroactively registered and the date of retroactive registration.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form 24F-1'

Popular issues of different closed-end or unit investment trusts may occasionally sell more shares than originally stated in the initial registration statement. When this occurs, the management company files a retroactive election to register any shares sold over the previously registered amount.

Related SEC Forms: N-2, 24F-2NT, 24F-2EL

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