SEC Form 6-K

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form 6-K'

A form administrated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the 6-K is a required submission for foreign private issuers of securities, pursuant to stated rules in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Any information that a foreign company issues to its local securities regulators, investors or stock exchange must also be submitted on the Form 6-K. As such, the 6-K is a catch-all for material information that arises in between annual and quarterly financial reports, which are also submitted to the SEC.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form 6-K'

This form essentially allows U.S. investors in foreign securities to have the same access to information that investors in the foreign company's home market receive. This transparency of information is one of the most important ingredients for an orderly and fair market. 6-K forms often include a duplication of the latest financial reports such as income statements, balance sheets and cash flow statements.

A filing that shows "6-K/A" is an amended Form 6-K, filed when material information changes.

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