SEC Form F-1

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form F-1'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) required for the registration of certain securities by foreign issuers. SEC Form F-1 is required to register securities issued by foreign issuers for which no other specialized form exists or is authorized.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form F-1'

Form F-1, which is also known as the Registration Statement, is a requirement under the Securities Exchange Act of 1933.

This act, often referred to as the "truth in securities" law, requires that these registration forms, providing essential facts, are filed to disclose important information upon registration of a company's securities. Form F-1 helps the SEC achieve the objectives of this act - requiring investors to receive significant information regarding securities offered and prohibiting fraud in the sale of the offered securities.

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