SEC Form F-X

AAA

DEFINITION of 'SEC Form F-X'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that requires an issuer that is doing one of the following to appoint an agent that may be served processes, pleadings, subpoenas or other papers:

  • registering securities using SEC Forms F-8, F-9, F-10 or F-80 under the Securities Act of 1933;
  • registering securities using SEC Form 40-F under the Securities Act of 1933;
  • filing tender offer documents on SEC Forms 13E-4F, 14D-1F or 14D-9F;
  • a Canadian issuer qualifying an offering pursuant to Regulation A; or
  • any foreign issuer using Form CB in connection with a tender offer, rights offering or business combination; or acting as trustee for securities registered using form F-7, F-8, F-9, F-10, F-80

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form F-X'

Form F-X is also known as the Appointment of Agent for Service of Process and Undertaking, and is filed under the Securities Act of 1933. This Act, often referred to as the "truth in securities" law, requires that these registration forms, which provide essential facts, be filed in order to disclose important information upon registration of a company's securities. This helps the SEC achieve the Act's objectives: that investors are able to receive significant information regarding securities offered, and to prevent fraud in the sale of the offered securities.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  2. Regulation A

    An exemption from the registration requirements mandated by the ...
  3. System for Electronic Document ...

    The system used for electronically filing most securities information ...
  4. Securities Exchange Act Of 1934

    The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 was created to provide governance ...
  5. Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis ...

    The electronic filing system created by the Securities and Exchange ...
  6. Slander

    Slander is the act of harming one person’s reputation by telling ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Where can I find a company's annual report and its SEC filings?

    Thanks to the Internet, finding financial reports is easier than ever. Nowadays, every reputable company has an investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What happens to the fines collected by the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    When the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) enforces a civil action against a corporation or an individual found guilty ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What role does the Inspector General play with the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The inspector general of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) oversees, audits and conducts investigations of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is trading volume regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has trading volume as a requirement for selling securities that are otherwise ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a private secondary market?

    Two kinds of private secondary markets exist. The first is a form of buying and selling of pre-existing financial commitments ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Financial Footnotes: Start Reading The Fine Print

    Find out what could be hidden in this often-overlooked part of the financial statements.
  2. Professionals

    Get A Job In Compliance

    If you're a stickler for rules, this could be a promising career path for you.
  3. Investing Basics

    The Flow Of Company Information

    Learn how to gather all the pieces before you start to put together your puzzle.
  4. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  5. Economics

    What Does Infrastructure Mean?

    Examples of infrastructure include mass transit, communication, sewage, water and electric systems, plus roads, bridges and tunnels.
  6. Economics

    What's a Centrally Planned Economy?

    A centrally planned economy is one where the government controls the country’s supply and demand of goods and services.
  7. Investing

    Can You Be Sued for Negative Comments Online?

    It's important to understand the basics of libel law so you can avoid posting statements that might result in a lawsuit.
  8. Entrepreneurship

    Risks Associated With Government Contracts

    Government contracts can be rewarding, but they also come with a variety of risks.
  9. Entrepreneurship

    10 Public Companies That Rely On Govt. Contracts

    We look at 10 of the top public companies whose businesses rely on U.S. government contracts.
  10. Professionals

    Can Young Workers Rely on Social Security?

    Young savers have time on their hands to take advantage of many investment strategies, and they should because Social Security alone might not be enough.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!