SEC Form N-17f-1

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form N-17f-1'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that must be submitted by investment companies that place or maintain securities or similar investments in the custody of a company that is a member of a national securities exchange. When filing a SEC Form N-17f-1, the investment company is also required to retain an independent public accountant to verify the company's securities and similar investments by actual examination three times during each fiscal year. The accountant must prepare a certificate stating that the examination has occurred, and describing the examination, and must transmit the certificate to the SEC as well as to the appropriate state administrators.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form N-17f-1'

SEC Form N-17f-1 is also known as "Certificate of Accounting of Securities and Similar Investments of a Management Investment Company in the Custody of Members of National Securities Exchanges." This filing is required under rule 17f-1 under section 17(f) of the Investment Company Act of 1940. The purpose of this form is to ensure that the certificate is properly attributed to the investment company.

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