SEC Form N-27D-1

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DEFINITION of 'SEC Form N-27D-1'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that must be submitted by the depositor or principal underwriter of an issuer of periodic payment plan certificates to indicate whether it has access to enough cash to meet its statutory refund obligations. SEC Form N-27D-1 reports the balance at the beginning of the period, deposits and withdrawals made, interest income earned, realized gains or losses, unrealized gains or losses, and the balance at the end of the period.

BREAKING DOWN 'SEC Form N-27D-1'

SEC Form N-27D-1 is also known as "Accounting of Segregated Trust Account." It is required under Rule N-27D-1 of the Investment Company Act of 1940 and allows the SEC to monitor compliance with reserve requirements.

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