SEC Form N-3

AAA

DEFINITION of 'SEC Form N-3'

A filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that must be submitted by all insurance company separate accounts organized as management investment companies offering variable annuity contracts. SEC Form N-3 is required under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Investment Company Act of 1940, and is meant to provide investors with information about variable annuity contracts so they can determine whether to invest in them.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'SEC Form N-3'

Part A of this filing, the prospectus, must contain clearly-written information about the investment that the average investor, who may not have a specialized background in finance or law, can understand. Part A contains a general description of the insurance company and a general description of the contracts as well as information on accumulation units, management, deductions and expenses, annuity options available, death benefit, purchases and contract value, redemptions, taxes, and pending legal proceedings. Part B contains additional information about investment objectives and policies, purchasing and pricing of securities being offered, underwriters and more. Finally, Part C provides the company's financial statements, names of directors and officers of the insurance company and other required information.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Investment Company Act Of 1940

    Created in 1940 through an act of Congress, this piece of legislation ...
  2. SEC Form N-30B-2

    A form filed with the SEC that applies to investment companies ...
  3. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  4. Death Benefit

    The amount on a life insurance policy or pension that is payable ...
  5. Prospectus

    A formal legal document, which is required by and filed with ...
  6. Securities Act Of 1933

    A federal piece of legislation enacted as a result of the market ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Where can I find a company's annual report and its SEC filings?

    Thanks to the Internet, finding financial reports is easier than ever. Nowadays, every reputable company has an investor ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What role does the Inspector General play with the Securities and Exchange Commission?

    The inspector general of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) oversees, audits and conducts investigations of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How long does it take to execute an M&A deal?

    Even the simplest merger and acquisition (M&A) deals are challenging. It takes a lot for two previously independent enterprises ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is trading volume regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has trading volume as a requirement for selling securities that are otherwise ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What do I do if I think an accountant is in violation of the Generally Accepted Accounting ...

    The Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) promulgates generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    SEC Filings: Forms You Need To Know

    The forms companies are required to file provide a clear view of their histories and progress.
  2. Professionals

    Get A Job In Compliance

    If you're a stickler for rules, this could be a promising career path for you.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Personal Finance

    Who's Looking Out For Investors?

    If your account has been mishandled, FINRA and the SEC are among several organizations that can help.
  5. Fundamental Analysis

    Present Value Interest Factor of Annuity (PVIFA)

    PVIFA can be used to calculate the present value of a series of annuities by considering cash flows and depreciation.
  6. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
  7. Investing

    Can You Be Sued for Negative Comments Online?

    It's important to understand the basics of libel law so you can avoid posting statements that might result in a lawsuit.
  8. Investing Basics

    How To Create Capital Protected Investment Using Options?

    Does "Capital-Protection" guarantee in an investment product sound attractive? Wait! Here's how you can create a better one for yourself, at low-cost!
  9. Options & Futures

    How to Make Money by Trading Index Options

    Index options are less volatile and more liquid than regular options. Understand how to trade index options with this simple introduction.
  10. Investing

    4 Structured Product Types Wealthy Clients Love

    High-net-worth investors find structured products appealing for a variety of reasons. Here's a look at four types.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  2. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  3. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  4. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  5. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  6. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!